A man holding his head in front of his car full of moving boxes

There is no denying that relocating is a complicated process. Not only from the technical aspect, but from the emotional one too. Regardless of whether you are moving just down the street, a new neighborhood or a different city, it won’t all be easy. Especially if renovating projects should take place before moving in, even if everything is well-prepared. And some people will handle the emotions better than others. Why moving to a new home is so unsettling for some people but not as nerve-racking for others is a matter of personality. Some people are highly sensitive and have trouble dealing with change. And some truly will have no problem transitioning to a new home. Why that is so is the topic of this article.

Moving to a New Home is More Unsettling for Highly Sensitive People

When you change the environment, you move away from what felt familiar and comfortable. Even traveling can feel overwhelming for overly sensitive people. Although they know they will be back in their homes soon, they crave the comfort of the familiar. These emotions escalate once they move to a new home because it is permanent.

Few are the people who have no emotional attachment to their homes. Still, for highly sensitive individuals, this attachment is more profound and is connected to their wellbeing. So, once they start preparing for relocation from their familiar environment, they feel a whole range of strong emotions. They experience deep sadness, regret, frustration, even anger and feel lost, disconnected, and think that they’ll be isolated in the new space.

It takes time to become attached to a new home. Also, different people will need different amounts of time to finally feel at home in the new place. And until they do, they will be unhappy. So, while it is perfectly normal to feel upset after relocating to a new home, highly sensitive people will struggle with this more.

Highly Sensitive People Grieve Their Old Homes

Familiar surroundings, including your home, neighborhood, and all familiar places, are like an anchor for some people. Without it, they start feeling lost, as if they were set adrift. Those feelings are a form of grieving, and it is necessary to go through this process before you can get over it.

Besides all the emotions connected to separation from the old home, moving also entails a lot of exhaustion. It is a complicated and lengthy process that involves many moving parts – packing, finding a new home to buy or rent, planning the logistics of the entire process, and finally moving all of your worldly possessions to the new place. Although you can find professionals to help you with the technical parts, moving will still take a lot of your energy. And during the process, you won’t have a lot of chances to recharge. Not with all the chaos, commotion, and hurry.

If you are a sensitive person, this inability to find emotional calm and center yourself can trigger the fight-or-flight response. As a result, you may have difficulty settling in the new home. And the longer this state progresses, the more the anxiety settles. However, never forget that no matter how bad this is, it is still a temporary feeling. It might take you longer than an average person, but you will eventually feel at home in the new place.

The Reasons Behind the Negative Feelings

As we have established, more sensitive people will react more emotionally to change. But all people will go through the adjustment period, and they will deal with some emotions; the only difference is the intensity they will experience them. It is crucial for them to have all the help they can get, and team up with professional companies such as Home Grown Moving, who can lead the way and simplify the whole process, and make moving to a new home less unsettling.

People who have recently moved often spend their time differently

In a new environment, people often neglect active leisure. For example, people who exercise or have a hobby frequently stop dedicating their time to them in a new home, at least for a while. If they have moved further from their family and friends, they tend to spend more time in front of their computers. In general, they spend little time on activities that are not home or work-related. The longer this persists, the harder it becomes.

There is a feeling of loneliness

When you move, you often don’t have close friends around you. And since you are already struggling with the sadness and the feeling of being unanchored, you may feel too stressed to engage in social interactions and get out of your comfort zone even more. As you don’t go out and meet new people, you don’t receive many invitations to socialize. It is a chain reaction.

Knowing why you feel bad will help you find solutions

When you understand why moving to a new home is so unsettling for you, while others have less trouble, you will have an easier time finding ways to get over those bad feelings and start settling in your new environment. It’s crucial you give yourself enough time to prepare for your move and then to recharge emotionally. Try to predict the things that the relocation will bring you and look forward to them. Also, anticipate what may cause you trouble and think of ways to mitigate them.

Once you arrive at your new home, unpack as soon as you can. Clutter and general disarray are known to cause or deepen anxiety, so try to tidy up the place as soon as you can. Also, give yourself a few days to rest before you continue with your daily duties.

Finally, once you are there, don’t give in to the temptation to stay cooped up in your home in front of your laptop. Go out, say hello to your new neighbors, and walk around to know the new area. Accept invitations to dinner and continue with your hobbies or exercising routines. It will all help you settle in, put down your roots, and form an attachment to your new home.

Moving to a new home is more unsettling for some people, and if you feel overwhelmed, know that you are not alone. Many have gone through this and have succeeded. So will you.

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